Spartan Hoplite Finished!

Well, after painting in a few irregular sessions over the past few weeks, here is the finished Spartan Hoplite in 54mm.

54mm in all its glory.
54mm in all its glory.
A view of the shield.
A view of the shield.
Advertisements

54mm 4th Century BCE Spartan Hoplite (WIP)

Osprey Elite Warrior Series.
Osprey Elite Warrior Series.

It has been a few months since my last post, I wish I could blame my distractions on either Grad School, Work or family commitments, but the truth is I have been somewhat lazy.

I recently found and purchased some 54mm models from Tin Soldiers .  I have been wanting to make the transition to larger models for some time now and decided to finally take the plunge.  The last large scale (above 28mm) model that I painted must have been more than 10 years ago, and that was for Inquisitor– you know, the 40k game with crap rules and great models.

So I decided to jump in with a unarmored Spartan Hoplite, wearing only a pilos helmet- fairly typical in the 3rd – 4th Century BCE- and before the adoption of Macedonian equipment and tactics in 225 BCE.  I guess I was inspired by the Osprey book cover.

Unpainted MiniatureThis first picture is of the unpainted, unprimed model- just the way it came out of the package.  I was impressed at the level of detail and the lack of flash or other casting imperfections that are fairly common with metal models.  The metal is rather soft- not hard like pewter, but unless you drop it, it should hold up well.  For $10 you really can’t beat the quality.

PrimedAfter some very minor touch ups with a file the model was ready to go.  The first step in painting- which any experienced modeler will tell you is actually the second step- right after clean up- is priming the model.  I didn’t do anything special, I used Armory Brand white primer straight out the can.  It covered well and brought up some of the details- which were really stunning.

I then let the model dry for a couple of days- the first couple of hours were under my heat/drying lamp.

Flesh WorkThe next step- and actually the first time I got to put a paint brush onto the model- I started with the flesh.  Now I used a 5 step process for speed, and overall effect:

#1 Paint all the flesh area(s) with your desired flesh tone.

#2 Use a dark wash (I used AP Strong Tone) and allowed it to dry.

#3 Go back and repaint all but the deepest area(s) the original flesh tone- this is a shading step.

#4 Then wash the painted areas with a thinned (50% water) mix of AP Soft Tone- and allow to completely dry.

#5 Pick out area(s) for final highlight effect using original flesh tone- it is pretty fast and quick and doesn’t require too much technical skill (like wet-blending) or knowledge with a color pallet.  I estimate my total time in the model thus far is less than 2-3 hours.

I will keep you all up to date.

Small (15mm) Break- Some DBA Trojans

Earlier today, I took a break from my 28mm Byzantine Army to work on a template (for later production) for my DBA Trojans.  It was a good break from the endless painted to be able to work on a single unit.

So I decided to complete an entire stand of Magister Militum Trojans, some excellent looking figures.  I couldn’t stand the look of the Essex models and I am very glad I was able to get these instead.  Well, not much to say other than I based coated them and washed them with Army Painter Soft Tone wash.

View of miniatures without shields attached.
View of miniatures without shields attached.
Alternate View without Shields
Alternate View without Shields

So after some they were done to this stage, I then painted the cow-hide shields separately.  Again, I used AP Soft Tone on the shields and then attached them with some Super Glue Gel- Which is one of my favorites for small bits and pieces.

 

So I finished them off and added a few highlights before spraying with dullcote
So I finished them off and added a few highlights before spraying with dullcote
Alternate View of Finished Stand.  AP Jungle Tuft for greenery.
Alternate View of Finished Stand. AP Jungle Tuft for greenery.

Byzantine Light Infantry

Well, I have completed a 20 man, mixed unit of Byzantine light infantry.  The unit consists of 14 unarmored spearmen which are supported by 6 unarmored bowmen.

Historically, formations such as this were referred to a ‘Phalanx’, and consisted of multiple types of troops organized with spear/pikes to the front and lighter missile troops, which included javelin-men and bowmen in support.  Well here they are, arrayed for your review.

Byzantine Light Infantry- Front View
Byzantine Light Infantry- Front View
Byzantine Light Infantry- Side View
Byzantine Light Infantry- Side View